Last edited by Taramar
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

3 edition of Energy costs of using Columbia River water for irrigation. found in the catalog.

Energy costs of using Columbia River water for irrigation.

David F. Schuy

Energy costs of using Columbia River water for irrigation.

by David F. Schuy

  • 167 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published in Pullman .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 12-13.

SeriesExtension mimeo -- 3891., Extension mimeo (Washington State University. Cooperative Extension) -- 3891.
The Physical Object
Pagination13 p.
Number of Pages13
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14650495M
OCLC/WorldCa1522580

for the purpose of irrigation. Based on presentations given to the Columbia River Umatilla Solutions Task Force (CRUST), the three costs that dictate economic feasibility of irrigation projects are (1) the capital cost of the infrastructure, (2) power costs and maintenance, and (3) the cost of obtaining mitigation water from the Columbia River. ground-water usage, imported and native surface! water is used for irrigation in several areas on the plateau. The surface water is almost fully appropriated, and the demand for more irrigation water is increasing. The Columbia Plateau aquifer system is the probable new source of irrigation by:

light energy use in urban water systems. Our examinations of the Westlands Water District and the Columbia River Basin illustrate energy use in agricultural settings. Our research found the following. The Columbia River in all its dimensions: scientific, engineering, historical, cultural. CEE 17SC, EARTHSYS 16SC, HISTORY 29SC, POLISCI 14SC. This seminar will explore the nature of and coupling between water, energy, and environmental resources in the Pacific Northwest.

  Irrigation water is essential for keeping fruits, vegetables, and grains growing to feed the world's population, and this has been a constant for thousands of years. Throughout the world, irrigation (water for agriculture, or growing crops) is probably the most important use of water (except for drinking and washing a smelly dog, perhaps). The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply.


Share this book
You might also like
Quick motorcycle tune-ups.

Quick motorcycle tune-ups.

Divers views, opinions, and prophecies

Divers views, opinions, and prophecies

Degas (1834-1917)

Degas (1834-1917)

Handbook of human resources for credit unions

Handbook of human resources for credit unions

Erotic subjects

Erotic subjects

Thomas Fullers the holy state and the profane state

Thomas Fullers the holy state and the profane state

Capitalist discipline, private justice and the hidden economy

Capitalist discipline, private justice and the hidden economy

National cemetery site selection, Pennsylvania, and the vicinity of the District of Columbia

National cemetery site selection, Pennsylvania, and the vicinity of the District of Columbia

Saints everlasting rest

Saints everlasting rest

Bretton Hall, 1949-1968

Bretton Hall, 1949-1968

Pocket Anatomy of the Circulatory System

Pocket Anatomy of the Circulatory System

Modern American painting, 1910-1940

Modern American painting, 1910-1940

Energy costs of using Columbia River water for irrigation by David F. Schuy Download PDF EPUB FB2

Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link)Author: David F.

Schuy. Another benefit that stems directly from the unique nature of the Columbia Basin is irrigation. In fact, six percent of the Columbia River Basin’s yearly runoff is diverted to irrigate about million acres of land.

Much of the water that is diverted eventually finds its way back into the river system. Nearly all of the potatoes, sugar beets, hops, fruit, vegetables, and mint grown in the Columbia River Basin are irrigated, as are large crops of hay and grain.

Water withdrawals for irrigation take water away from hydropower production. Irrigation is the largest non-hydropower use of water in the Columbia River Basin. The magnitude of energy costs imposed on the general public by irrigation de-velopment in Washington is very large.

These costs come about through two separate phenomena. As water is withdrawn from the Snake and Columbia Rivers for irrigation, use of this water for creating hydropower is lost.

Columbia River Basin. About 31/2 million people use approxi­ mately 3 billion gallons of surface and ground water daily. During irrigation season nearly 54 billion gallons of water are withdrawn or diverted each day to irrigate 51/2 million acres of land.

River to Lewiston, Idaho; salmon fishing. The irrigation system carried its first water from Grand Coulee Dam to ab acres in spring of Irrigation water from the Columbia Basin Project is often used more than once before it returns to the Columbia River near Pasco.

Potholes Reservoir collects runoff from the north for farms in the south. This is the 18th year the Council has reported to the governors on the cost of implementing the Council’s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, which Bonneville funds. The purpose of the report is to provide information, not to assess or comment on the costs.

Comparative Energy Costs for Irrigation Pumping One major cost of pumping irrigation water is the cost of energy. Increasing energy prices require irrigation farmers to consider future availability as well as price when comparing energy alternatives. Derating Power Units Making power cost comparisons between different makesFile Size: 85KB.

The direct cost of water to irrigators, when the water is supplied by irrigation companies or irrigation dis-tricts, varies between $5 and $ per acre per year. In many areas, however, water is relatively low in cost. Low cost water can lead to inefficient use if an irriga-tor.

Given the high costs of maintenance, water supply and decreasing production yield, it was decided to replace it with a more modern system of subirrigation, which became operational in In order to compare the two different installations, technical properties of the plants and their water Author: M.

Deangelis, G. Negrini. PREFACE December T he field of water resources covers a wide range of topics and s ubject matter.

This handbook focuses on one of those, the issue of water. The Sustainability of the Columbia Basin’s Irrigation System Posted by Andrew McGuire | June 2, Although now teenagers, while in Ephrata’s elementary school my three daughters learned about hydropower generation, electricity and the dams owned and operated by.

Irrigation scheduling can minimize the total volume of water applied to the field. Demonstration projects in central Nebraska have indicated that inches of water can be saved by monitoring soil water and estimating crop water use rates.

The goal is to maximize use of stored soil water and precipitation to minimize Size: KB. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, all major hydropower-producing dams on the main stem of the Columbia River (dams of interest) create approximately $19 million in revenue per day, or nearly $7 billion each yearA tax could be an important source.

Enhancing Water Use Efficiency in Irrigated Agriculture Article (PDF Available) in Agronomy Journal 93(2) March w Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Terry A. Howell. (Info Paper Usace, Aug ) By using a renewable resource to produce massive amounts of energy, the Bonneville Dam also provides many other services to the surrounding areas.

The Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) refers to the federally owned hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River. The Columbia River Treaty 2 was signed in by representatives of Canada and the United States and was ratified by the two governments by The treaty provided for the construction of four upper Columbia River basin storage dams: Duncan (), Keenlyside (), and Mica (), all in Canada, and Libby in Montana ().

PAGE 3 | Pipe Dreams: Water Supply Pipeline Projects in the West location where it would be used. An acre-foot (af) of water weighs more than 1, tons. Therefore, the energy costs associated. Economic benefits and costs.

According to the federal Bureau of Reclamation the yearly value of the Columbia Basin Project is $ million in irrigated crops, $ million in power production, $20 million in flood damage prevention, and $50 million in recreation. The cost of irrigation water in the Jordan Valley (English) Abstract.

Jordan is one of the most water-stressed countries in the world. Its annual renewable resources of cubic meters per capita are far below the threshold of severe water scarcity of cubic by: 1. E F F E C T S OF I R R I G A T I O N ON WATER QUALITY* by F R E D E R I C K L.

H O T E S Irrigation Adviser, International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank), Washington, D.C., U.S.A. and E R M A N A. P E A R S O N Professor of Sanitary Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California, U.S.A.

Summary Increased attention is being given to the potential adverse Cited by: 6.In the Northwest, for example, electricity from hydropower typically costs $10 per megawatt hour to produce.

This compares to $60, $45 and $25 per megawatt hour to produce electricity, respectively, at nuclear, coal and natural gas plants. Agriculture is a major user of ground and surface water in the United States, accounting for approximately 80 percent of the Nation's consumptive water use and over 90 percent in many Western States.

Efficient irrigation systems and water management practices can help maintain farm profitability in an era of increasingly limited and more costly water supplies.